Mullyangiri Trekking

If you are staying nearby mountains full of greenery, nothing can make your weekend wonderful except to visit it. Well I wanted to go for trekking for so long time, but till now some how it got delayed. Few days ago, my colleagues  were discussing about a club (BMC) which organizes trekking program. I visited their site, they gave full description of full schedule, i went through it and I registered my self along with my two friends (Amit & Santosh).

We started this trip/trekking at Friday night (11th of Jan). We reached Mullyangiri base camp very early in the morning (4:30 am). It was very cold there. Quickly we made our self comfortable under blankets/sleeping bags. After couple of hours we made our self ready for trekking which includes light breakfast. Then organizers gave us some instruction about trekking. Like

  • No alcohol during trekking
  • Watch your step
  • Don’t go ahead of person in group and don’t stay behind of the last person in group.

IMG_1261

Then we had some light moments, starting with introduction of every one and answer to the question, “Which is the thing you will carry, if you’re going to stuck on lonely island?”. Everybody gave different interesting answers like, Swiss knife, Laptop, husband, good rope, Diary etc etc…

After this light/happy moments we reached to starting point of trekking which was 8 km away from base camp. For starting of trekking this part was bit difficult because straight away we had to go for very steep part of trekking. But I was confident on my self. In the description only organizers informed us that level of trekking would be Moderate to Difficult.

 IMG_1272 IMG_1280 IMG_1562 IMG_1466 IMG_1352 IMG_1311 IMG_1283

After 4 km of steep climbing we were on the peak Mullayangiri. We visited couple of caves there. We prayed in the temple situated on the peak. Took so many photographs. Though the sun was shining we were not feeling the temperature very much. I have to stay that this part of India has best of the conditions. After few minutes of rest at this point we were headed to our next destination. This part of trekking was around 3 km long and very easy, we just had to walk.

At around 12-1 pm (not sure) we reached forest check point, I am not sure about the name of this check point. After few minutes, lunch came from base camp. We were so tired that though we were eating veg biryani with raita/achar, it felt so delicious. I had two plates of Biryani 😀 . Some of the experienced guys were telling that in last few years they didn’t had this kind of tasty food. Well, it was not the effect of food, it was effect of the trekking and nice weather.

At around 3 pm started for second part of trekking. Well have to say that this part of trekking was the difficult one, specially after the heavy lunch. For this part of trekking we were suppose to cross one hill, and the path was on it’s peak. Some parts of this was so dangerous that if you lose a step, not a bone will be in a single piece. That part lasted for around 3 km. Now stamina of different persons were coming in to picture. Some professional trekkers were way ahead(2-3 kms, if I am not exaggerating). I was average in stamina. For this part we were suppose to reach mobile towers near Manikyadhara Falls and then to Manikyadhara. At around 5 pm I was at that destination, did some chatting with so called professional trekkers. One of them had done trekking in Himalayas. They were carrying all the branded stuff. They greeted me for completing this trek. They told me that you have lots of things to share with your friends. They added that right then I was very tired but when you share that experience with my friend I will bluff that that was very easy, I can do it any time :P.  After few minutes Santo and Amit also joined me. We had few snaps there.

Then after few minutes we were at Manikyadhara falls, due to cold weather and monkeys I decided not to go near by falls. The fall was very small, it was pilgrimage of both hindu and muslim religion. I took rest there for few minutes. Then again in cab we reached our base camp again. We sat near bonfire, we ate dinner. We were suppose sleep in tents, that’s nice experience everybody should take. After sleeping I don’t know how night passed.

IMG_1595

In morning organizers waked us up at 7 am. After breakfast we headed toward Dabedabe falls (I am not sure about the name). To visit that fall we had to go 1km downhill, but it was worth. That fall was very beautiful. Though weather was cold, water was cold everybody could not resist them slef to get wet in that fall. If you go under that fall, in few seconds your body will loose all senses. For me it is like brainwash.

IMG_1715                IMG_1642               IMG_1637

Well this was the last part of this adventure. Thanks to BMC for organizing such a wonderful-adventurous event. Thanks Santo & Amit for giving me company.

Following is the summary of this adventure.

Duration: 2 nights 2 days

Starting Point: Bangalore

Date : 11th jan to 13 jan 2013.

Organizer: BMC, Bangalore

Posted in Adventures.... | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

2012 in review

Thank you followers/Visitors from all over the world for wonderful year….

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 32,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 7 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

Posted in Interview Que | Leave a comment

How to create strong password

For few days I was struggling that how to create strong passwords and remember them. I wanted to create strong password for my various accounts. So I surfed net and found few things. I will also share one technique of creating strong password and simple way to remember it which is suggested by one student from IIT roorkee.

Before discussing these techniques, I want to tell some important points about password.

  • Don’t use some very usual strings like “asdf”, “abcd”, “qwerty”…
  • If you use numbers in password don’t use number patterns such as “1234”, “1111”, “112233..”, your birth date..
  • Don’t use your name or nick name as password.
  • Use special characters in the password.
  • Prefer combination of normal characters, special characters and number as your password.
  • Don’t use same password for all accounts.
  • It must be 8 characters long.
  • Technique – 1

This technique involves replacing few characters with special characters. Few examples are given below:

  • a – @
  • s – $
  • space – % or _
  • i – !
  • zero – o

For example if your password is “stuart little”, it will become “$tu@rt%l!ttle”.

Now for different accounts, you can add a/c name at the end or starting of the password.

For example: “stuart littlegmail” it will be transformed as “$tu@rt%l!ttlegm@!l”

If you have more than one accounts for gmail you can use numbers at the end of password such as “$tu@rt%l!ttlegm@!l1” , “$tu@rt%l!ttlegm@!l2”.

This technique is very simple and easy to remember.

  • Technique – 2

This technique is suggested by one of students “Abhishek Bafna” from IIT roorkee. This technique creates very strong password, because it uses combination of characters, special characters and numbers.

Technique is given below:

Password       =     Random word     +  (Random position string, Random character string  )
Ca%s$p9er    =        Casper            +  (                 357           ,               %$9                 )

As shown above to create password, we need to choose a random word, random position string and a random character string.
Random word: it is any string which you can remember easily.
Random position string: it is any number of 3-4 digits
Random character string: this string should contain special characters and numbers.

Now, to form password take first digit of random position string, in above example it is “3” and then we will put first character of random string at the 3rd position in the random word. Similarly, take 2nd and 3rd digit from the random position string and according to it put random characters in the given postions.

This technique creates very strong and random password that no one can guess. To use this technique you need to remember just 3 above mentioned things.

I hope these techniques will help you in creating strong password.

Posted in Probs | Leave a comment

HTG Explains: Why You Shouldn’t Use a Task Killer On Android

Published on October 25th, 2012  |  Written by: Chris Hoffman
 

image

Some people think that task killers are important on Android. By closing apps running in the background, you’ll get improved performance and battery life – that’s the idea, anyway. In reality, task killers can reduce your performance and battery life.

Task killers can force apps running in the background to quit, removing them from memory. Some task killers do this automatically. However, Android can intelligently manage processes on its own – it doesn’t need a task killer.

Android Doesn’t Manage Processes Like Windows

Most Android users are familiar with Windows. On Windows, many programs running at one time – whether they’re windows on your desktop or applications in your system tray – can decrease your computer’s performance. Closing applications when you’re not using them can help speed up your Windows computer.

However, Android isn’t Windows and doesn’t manage processes like Windows does. Unlike on Windows, where there’s an obvious way to close applications, there’s no obvious way to “close” an Android application. This is by design and isn’t a problem. When you leave an Android app, going back to your home screen or switching to another app, the app stays “running” in the background. In most cases, the app will be paused in the background, taking up no CPU or network resources. Some apps will continue using CPU and network resources in the background, of course – for example, music players, file-downloading programs, or apps that sync in the background.

When you go back to an app you were recently using, Android “unpauses” that app and you resume where you left off. This is fast because the app is still stored in your RAM and ready to be used again.

image

Why Task Killers Are Bad

Proponents of task killers notice that Android is using a lot of RAM – in fact, Android stores a lot of apps in its memory, filling up the RAM! However, that isn’t a bad thing. Apps stored in your RAM can be quickly switched to without Android having to load them from its slower storage.

Empty RAM is useless. Full RAM is RAM that is being put to good use for caching apps. If Android needs more memory, it will force-quit an app that you haven’t used in a while – this all happens automatically, without installing any task killers.

Task killers think they know better than Android. They run in the background, automatically quitting apps and removing them from Android’s memory. They may also allow you to force-quit apps on your own, but you shouldn’t have to do this.

Task killers aren’t just useless – they can reduce performance. If a task killer removes an app from your RAM and you open that app again, the app will be slower to load as Android is forced to load it from your device’s storage. This will also use more battery power than if you just left the app in your RAM in the first place. Some apps will automatically restart after the task killer quits them, using more CPU and battery resources.

Whether RAM is empty or full, it takes the same amount of battery power – decreasing the amount of apps stored in RAM won’t improve your battery power or offer more CPU cycles.

image

When Task Killers Can Help

At this point, there are probably some people who are thinking that this isn’t true – they’ve used a task killer in the past and it’s helped increase their battery life and improve their Android phone’s performance.

This may actually be true. If you have a bad app that’s using CPU and other resources in the background, a task killer that closes the misbehaving app can improve your battery life and make your phone faster.

However, using a task killer to deal with a misbehaving app is like using a shotgun to kill a fly – you may fix your problem, but you’re inflicting a lot of other damage in the process.

Instead of using a task killer in this situation, you should identify the bad app and uninstall it, replacing it with an app that works properly. To pin down the app that’s misbehaving, you can try the Watchdog Task Manager app – it will show you which apps are actually using CPU in the background, not which apps are harmlessly being stored in memory.

image


Task killers can also cause other problems by killing applications that you want running in the background — for example, if you use an alarm clock app, you may find that your task killer forced the alarm clock app to quit, preventing the alarm from going off.

CyanogenMod, the popular community-developed Android ROM, won’t even accept bug reports from users using task killers, saying that they cause more problems than they solve.

In summary, you shouldn’t use a task killer – if you have a misbehaving app wasting resources in the background, you should identify it and uninstall it. But don’t just remove apps from your phone or tablet’s RAM – that doesn’t help speed anything up.

 

Original Link: http://www.howtogeek.com/127388/htg-explains-why-you-shouldnt-use-a-task-killer-on-android/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=251012

Posted in Interview Que | Leave a comment

Bangy…….

Ah….. New Story/Life starts with words “Bangy lag gai yaar…., finally!!!”

I had two months break in between and temperature at home was taking revenge. After long break at home, I reached Bangy (*Slang we use in college for Bangalore) on 30th June 2012. Ah, I was feeling like winter is nearby. Temperature was amazing, I dreamed of these condition in my childhood.

But life was not that easy, Bangy is very costly (at least i felt after been in KGP for two years), it was worse because for first income to get I had to wait for 30 daysssss.

On 2nd of July, I joined SanDisk as NCG (New College Graduates). After passing 2 years in KGP, when I saw huge buildings of Yahoo!, Oracle, TI; I was mesmerized… Oh Boy!!!

First week was kind of slow start or kind of get used to get used to the corporate environment.  You have to pass rest of your life in these conditions. We had campus to corporate training (do this, behave llike this, don’t do that, that looks rude… ah…. ). I have to leave all my naughty skill behind.. But I enjoyed those sessions, because I made so many friends.

So guess what, this was good restart/resume of corporate life of mine….

Everybody in my team, are always ready to help. I had welcome party organized by my team-mates. Most important based on my experience I got projects very early…..

My cubicle… it’s like mini KGP!!!

After this also, I feel like picture to abhi baki hai…. I hope I have so much to offer to my life/parents…. 🙂

Posted in Random Thoughts | Leave a comment

HTG Explains: Do You Really Need to Safely Remove USB Sticks? – taken from “How to Geek”

HTG Explains: Do You Really Need to Safely Remove USB Sticks?

image

You’ve probably heard that you always need to use the Safely Remove Hardware icon before unplugging a USB device. However, there’s also a good chance that you’ve unplugged a USB device without using this option and everything worked fine.

Windows itself tells you that you don’t need to use the Safely Remove Hardware option if you use certain settings – the default settings – but the advice Windows provides is misleading.

Quick Removal vs. Better Performance

Windows allows you to optimize your USB device for quick removal or improved performance. By default, Windows optimizes USB devices for quick removal. You can access this setting from the device manager – open the Start menu, type Device Manager, and press Enter to launch it.

Expand the Disk drives section in the Device Manager, right-click your device, and select Properties.

Select the Policies tab in the Properties window.  You’ll notice that Windows says you can disconnect your USB device safely without using the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon, so this means you can unplug your USB device without ever safely removing it, right? Not so fast.

Data Corruption Danger

The Windows dialog shown above is misleading. If you unplug your USB device while data is being written to it – for example, while you’re moving files to it or while you’re saving a file to it – this can result in data corruption. No matter which option you use, you should ensure that your USB device isn’t in-use before unplugging it – some USB sticks may have lights on them that blink while they’re being used.

However, even if the USB device doesn’t appear to be in-use, it may still be in-use. A program in the background may be writing to the drive – so data corruption could result if you unplugged the drive. If your USB stick doesn’t appear to be in-use, you can probably unplug it without any data corruption occurring – however, to be safe, it’s still a good idea to use the Safely Remove Hardware option. When you eject a device, Windows will tell you when it’s safe to remove – ensuring all programs are done with it.

Write Caching

If you select the Better Performance option, Windows will cache data instead of writing it to the USB device immediately. This will improve your device’s performance – however, data corruption is much more likely to occur if you unplug the USB device without using the Safely Remove Hardware option. If caching is enabled, Windows won’t write the data to your USB device immediately – even if the data appears to have been written to the device and all file progress dialogs are closed, the data may just be cached on your system.

When you eject a device, Windows will flush the write cache to the disk, ensuring all necessary changes are made before notifying you when it’s safe to remove the drive.

While the Quick Removal option decreases USB performance, it’s the default to minimize the chances of data corruption in day-to-day use – many people may forget to use – or never use – the Safely Remove Hardware option when unplugging USB devices.

Safely Removing Hardware

Ultimately, no matter which option you use, you should use the Safely Remove Hardware icon and eject your device before unplugging it. You can also right-click it in the Computer window and select Eject. Windows will tell you when it’s safe to remove the device, eliminating any changes of data corruption.


This advice doesn’t just apply to Windows – if you’re using Linux, you should use the Eject option in your file manager before unplugging a USB device, too. The same goes for Mac OS X.

Posted in Interview Que | Tagged | 2 Comments

How to create strong/secure password and remember them

For few days I was struggling that how to create strong passwords and remember them. I wanted to create strong password for my various accounts. So I surfed net and found few things. I will also share one technique of creating strong password and simple way to remember it which is suggested by one student from IIT roorkee.

Before discussing these techniques, I want to tell some important points about password.

  • Don’t use some very usual strings like “asdf”, “abcd”, “qwerty”…
  • If you use numbers in password don’t use number patterns such as “1234”, “1111”, “112233..”, your birth date..
  • Don’t use your name or nick name as password.
  • Use special characters in the password.
  • Prefer combination of normal characters, special characters and number as your password.
  • Don’t use same password for all accounts.
  • It must be 8 characters long.
  • Technique – 1

This technique involves replacing few characters with special characters. Few examples are given below:

  • a – @
  • s – $
  • space – % or _
  • i – !
  • zero – o

For example if your password is “stuart little”, it will become “$tu@rt%l!ttle”.

Now for different accounts, you can add a/c name at the end or starting of the password.

For example: “stuart littlegmail” it will be transformed as “$tu@rt%l!ttlegm@!l”

If you have more than one accounts for gmail you can use numbers at the end of password such as “$tu@rt%l!ttlegm@!l1” , “$tu@rt%l!ttlegm@!l2”.

This technique is very simple and easy to remember.

  • Technique – 2

This technique is suggested by one of students “Abhishek Bafna” from IIT roorkee. This technique creates very strong password, because it uses combination of characters, special characters and numbers.

Technique is given below:

Password = Random word + ( Random position string, Random character string)
Ca%s$p9er =Casper          + (                 357         ,                   %$9            )

As shown above to create password, we need to choose a random word, random position string and a random character string.
Random word: it is any string which you can remember easily.
Random position string: it is any number of 3-4 digits
Random character string: this string should contain special characters and numbers.

Now, to form password take first digit of random position string, in above example it is “3” and then we will put first character of random string at the 3rd position in the random word. Similarly, take 2nd and 3rd digit from the random position string and according to it put random characters in the given postions.

This technique creates very strong and random password that no one can guess. To use this technique you need to remember just 3 above mentioned things.

I hope these techniques will help you in creating strong password.

Posted in Probs | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment